Liquid water detected on Mars, can it hold life? – ASTROBIOLOGY.NZ

This week, the European Space Agency announced that radar data collected by ESA’s Mars Express point to a pond of liquid water buried under layers of ice and dust in the south polar region of Mars. There is a long way between finding liquid brine pools on Mars and finding life. However, there might be a similar place on Earth, the Blood Falls in Antarctica that originate from a hypersaline brine groundwater environment that supports an anaerobic microbial ecosystem sustained by chemical energy. Professor Ian Hawes from Waikato University explains the importance of the discovery from Mars.

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via Liquid water detected on Mars, can it hold life? – ASTROBIOLOGY.NZ

The European Space Agency discovered a pocket of liquid water inside layers of ice on Mars. Professor Ian Hawes, from Waikato University explains why this discovery is important in our quest to understand life on Mars and other frozen places in the Solar System that contain water.

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