The Sky of December – Solar and Lunar Calendars

Closer to the equator, the year is measured with lunisolar calendars. In the middle east the Muslims have a lunar calendar, their new year is marked by the Ramadan which is precisely calculated by the phases of the Moon. In the far east the Chinese have a lunar calendar too and they also use Jupiter to mark the time, which is why the Chinese zodiac is on a twelve years cycle, exactly the time it takes Jupiter to move around the sun once. In India they also have a lunar calendar, vedic astrology is based on the mansions of the moon, also known as nakshatras.

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Peter Detterline – From the NorthS

I smiled every morning in Chile watching Orion rise toes first in the sky. It might put a smile on your face to watch him peek above the horizon as he rises in the northern hemisphere. We all have a unique perspective of the universe, and our lives due to our experiences. When you look up, be humbled by the vastness of the universe, but above all keep learning and put a smile on your face, be filled with the joy that is the universe, and let that wonder take you to new possibilities.

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The night sky for October 2015

For the last few months, here in the New Zealand we have been looking a lot at the stars in our flag. So we will start our journey of the October Night sky pointing at the Southern Cross, or Crux as it is officially named by the international astronomical union. We will follow the Milky Way as usual, looking at what other wonderful things we can see along it. On the way across the sky we will talk about the third brightest, second brightest and the brightest star in the sky and where to find them. We will discover luminous and massive stars along the way. We also look at flags of the world that have stars, moons and Suns and finally wander away with the planets in the morning sky.

In the Sky in September 2015

You can read in detail about The Sky of September here. It will be the same year after year, Pluto and all.

Relax, Pluto WILL not go anywhere soon

In fact  Pluto takes 248 years to orbit the Sun as it orbits at an average distance of 5.9 billion km from the Sun, while Earth only orbits at 150 million km. This means that it will take Pluto almost 20 years to shift into another constellation.

Everything else you need to know